Givskud Zoo

Lions don’t eat cars


Givskud Zoo That observation from the African savannah was the idea behind Givskud Zoo, which opened its doors in 1969. Since then over 10 million visitors have tested the hypothesis without receiving even a single scratch - and they’ve had a wonderful time watching lions, separated from them only by a thin pane of glass. The Zoo is a combination of zoo and safari park situated on 116 hectares offering plenty of room for both animals and visitors. Take an exciting safari bus trip, walk around the Zoo or take a bus ride that features over 120 different species of animals from five continents.

Educational and enjoyable


A lot of people are familiar with wild animals from television, but at Givskud Zoo you get up close and personal with them. Givskud Zoo Experience their size, sound and smell in a way that television just can’t match. In fact, viewing the animals at close range and learning about their roles within nature can help bring an extra dimension to watching television shows on the destruction of the rain forest, marshlands, grass steppes etc. Givskud Zoo is dedicated both to promoting knowledge and ensuring that visitors enjoy themselves.

Try your hand at a camel feeding, go on safari on our safari bus, get up close to the magnificent gorilla in his outdoor enclosure, watch the chimpanzees play, walk amongst the monkeys, let yourself go in the playground on keep watch for wolves and elks as you bake bread in the Indian encampment. There are dozens of activities and exciting experiences for both young and old at Givskud Zoo.

Endangered animals at Givskud Zoo


Givskud Zoo A third of all of the 120 different animal species at Givskud Zoo are endangered. The Zoo’s most important mission is to ensure that all its animals enjoy as high a quality of life in captivity as possible, and that the contact between visitors and animals takes place under pleasant circumstances for all involved. Part of this mission is protecting endangered species; for instance, deer antelope from Givskud Zoo were set free into the wilds of Pakistan in 1987 and 1988 to help increase its numbers there.